Posts Tagged ‘ 8 Points ’

Frozen Yogurt Chart Pr0n

So, a while back I did something that was useful to myself as well as the other weight watchers out there with a taste for Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and made a chart with all of the point values for the tasty pints. Chart’s are a great way to see the point values for items, so I’ve returned to do it again. This chart maps out the point values for the healthy ice cream alternative that I’ve mentioned before: Stonyfield Farms Organic Frozen Yogurt. The list has fat free at the top, and low fat frozen yogurts at the bottom in blue. Remember folks, ice cream is never out of season, enjoy!

Per Serving Per Pint
Flavor Calories Fat Fiber Points Points
Gotta Have Vanilla 100 0 0 2 8
After Dark Chocolate 100 0 0 2 8
Vanilla Fudge Swirl 120 0 0 2 10
Gotta Have Java 100 0 0 2 8
Strawberry-licious 100 0 0 2 8
Crème Caramel 130 1.5 0 3 11
Minty Chocolate Chip 140 2.5 1 3 11
Cookies ‘n Cream 130 2 0 3 11
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What’s New: Cool Whip Free

So, let’s make some understatements of the century: I kinda have a thing for ice cream. Ice cream, in the quantity that I prefer to consume it, is not so healthy.

More blatantly, it’s nothing for me to polish off a pint of ice cream in a sitting, and that just doesn’t work on a diet. Or does it? I have previously talked about Stonyefield Farms Organic Frozen Yogurt in which an entire pint of their After Dark Chocolate flavor is only 7 points. That’s pretty darn good, but at the same time, those are some expensive pints. They make Ben and Jerry’s look like store brand pricing. So what is a humble ice cream deprived dieter supposed to do? Enter Cool Whip Free.

I see those looks. Those are the “What the heck is he thinking?” looks. Well, you’re kinda right, but don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. Most of us know what Cool Whip is. It’s that great white stuff (no snickering) that doesn’t come in a pressurized can (normally), and is most at home on top of fresh slices of pumpkin or pecan pie.

Now to get to the whippy, creamy state that is intended for pie application, we throw this tub into the fridge, but where do we first find it? That’s right folks, the freezer. Now what is this stuff like in the freezer? It’s more solid, although slightly elastic compared to ice cream. Still, it does fill that void of cold cream-like substance from the chilled beyond.

Okay, should probably get to the point now. A tub of Cool Whip is much cheaper than fancy organic frozen yogurt. The “Free” kind only has 15 calories per serving. This ends up being about 325 calories for an entire tub. That’s not so bad when you think about it. If you go nuts, and polish off an entire tub (it can happen) you’re only down 8 points. There you go folks, alternatives on the cheap. That, or it’s not a bad addition to normal desserts with a nice low calorie amount per serving.

Healthy Cooking: Zucchini and Summer Squash Pasta Medley

Ok, so vegitables aren’t for everyone. Exhibit A is my roommate. He has nothing against them in particular, but won’t go seeking them  out any time soon either. Me, I’m a different story. I LOVE fresh produce in my cooking, but due to expense, time, yadda yadda yadda, I usually limit it to some salad, green peppers, and onion.

Well due to an uncertain dinner schedule this past weekend, I came into my Monday night meal cooking with a little extra weekly produce: green and yellow zucchini, and of course an onion.

Now I know the whole zucchini and summer squash like group of veg isn’t for everyone. To some it’s taste, others texture, and still some simply un-adventurous people. Well dieters, and specifically Weight Watcher’s in particular should take note of these because they’re free (that’s 0 points folks) and can be cooked in any number of ways.

Well, at first I was thinking about grilling these things. It looks great, and tastes better, but laziness, and a lack of balsamic dressing scratched that plan. Instead I decided to create a pasta medley with my ingredients. Here’s how it went:

  • 1 green zucchini sliced (like cucumber), and then quartered to get reasonable chunks
  • 1 yellow zucchini chopped up the same way
  • 1 onion (your pick) sliced into half rings
  • 1 perfect portions chicken breast cut into large chunks
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat pasta
  • calorie free butter spray (my cooking crutch)
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • Seasoning (Italian blend, garlic, pepper, salt, and dill…and more dill)

So clearly my ingredient list wasn’t that awe inspiring, but still it was what I had. So after all the chopping, and prep work, I got my vegis cooking in one pan, chicken in another, and pasta boiling on a back burner. All of these things are pretty easy to cook, and fairly forgiving with their finishing times.

Once the chicken was cooked, I just dumped it in with the zucchini and onions to start those flavors working together. Then the pasta was done so I drained it, and chucked it in with everything else. A couple minutes, and some work with a spatula, and wallah: something edible looking.

Really, not that hard to do, and delicious would be an apt description. Oh did I mention that it made a TON!? It could probably feed two people, but it’s so low in points (2 for chicken, 4 for pasta, and just say 2 for the vegis due to volume), and I needed to get a bit closer to my total for the day, so I ate the lot. I walked away happy, and that’s all there is to it.

Deception at Subway: Nutrition Discrepancy?

So, I am a big fan of Subway, and love that they offer some Weight Watcher’s friendly menu items on their 6 grams of fat or less menu. Previously I wrote a post breaking down the point values of Jared’s menu items, and happily continued on my way. Just wanted to get that out there before I start the bashing.

Well recently, I was wondering what some of the nutritional values might be if I mixed it up a little. You know, be a rogue and have a flatbread instead of Jared’s standard wheat. Off I went to Subway’s helpful nutrition page to convert the numbers to a point value, when I discovered some shady, and misleading information.

Let’s talk numbers.  To start, we’ll begin with the basics: the nutrition for a sandwich as a 6 Grams of Fat or Less, and as a flatbread.

6″ Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki

Flatbread Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki

Calories

380

410

Fat

4.5 g

7 g

Fiber

5 g

3 g

Points

7

8

Ok, so there’s just a little difference here, so lets see where it comes from. We’ll look at the bread used.

6” 9-Grain Wheat Bread

Flatbread

Calories

210

240

Fat

2 g

5 g

Fiber

4 g

2 g

So, here is what we can take away. The difference in the breads account for the differences in the sandwiches almost exactly. Aka the only difference is the bread. But wait, there’s more! Jump now to Subway’s note at the bottom of the page:

Subs with 6 grams of fat or less include 9-Grain Wheat bread, lettuce tomatoes, onions, and green peppers. All other sandwich values include cheese unless otherwise noted” – Subway

So wait, this means that my flatbread has cheese on it right? What is this mysterious calorie and fat free cheese that Subway has discovered to make this possible? Well, it all depends on what they mean by “otherwise noted”.

Jumping over to the Sandwich Components section of their site, we can see what actually should go into a Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki:

Teriyaki glazed chicken strips, lettuce, tomatoes, red onions, green peppers, olives, and sweet onion sauce” – Subway

Ok, so this type of sub isn’t inherently made with cheese. I didn’t know that, Subway employees usually assume you want cheese anyways, and the nutrition page is misleading on what is supposed to contain cheese. Still, there are other problems even if we accept that the cheese not being part of the sub has been “otherwise noted”.

The sandwich description says that the sub comes with “olives and sweet onion sauce” in addition to the items that the nutrition page says makes up the 6 grams of fat or less subs. Now I’ll give them the olives, they hardly make a difference, but sweet onion sauce, although fat free, is not calorie free. So, should I assume that Jared’s version and the flatbread come with sauce, or that neither do?

Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate that Subway offers some nice options for the health conscious fast-food-goer, but still, a little transparency would be nice. For now, I say screw it, let there be cheese and sauce for all!!! Muahahahaha!!!

And as a parting shot:

6″ Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki

Flatbread Sweet Onion Chicken Terriyaki

Calories

380

410

Fat

4.5 g

7 g

Fiber

5 g

3 g

Points

7

8

Nom!: Fueled by Caesar

Ok so I’ve mentioned that I am now taking Shaolin Kempo lessons twice a week. Well, as the crazy person that I am, I’m still running my 4+ miles before class. With that, I understandably have a limited meal time. To the left is my healthy, light, and refreshing dinner…Well at least half of it.

I believe I’ve mentioned the Perdue Perfect Portions Chicken Breast previously, but if not, check them out. I cook one of these hunks of tasty bird up the night before, and shred/chop it up. Into a this bag of awesome it goes, and walla shake for instant dinner.

The best part is that this Fresh Express Caesar Salad doesn’t taste lite. I think the only difference between it and the regular is a lack of cheese…Hmm, should probably check that…Anyways, this acts as a nice refueling meal, hitting my body with vitamins, minerals, and punch of chicken-tastic protein before my class. Also, it is diet friendly at 8 points with the chicken added. Can’t go wrong there!

Grocery Store Sushi?


I know what you’re thinking; buying sushi from a large commercial grocery store just sounds like a bad plan. I’ll admit, I had the same reservations myself. I wondered if the fish would be OK, if anything would be spoiled, if it would be plain nasty, the works. I am happy to report that I am wrong.

All day yesterday, I had a hankering for sushi. These things happen, but I had fallen off of the diet wagon for a few days, and refused to stay on that downward slope. I will stick to my diet, and all that motivational stubbornness. Well, with my trusty weight watchers slide rule, I went to my local Stop & Shop (Malden, MA) to get stamps, and checked out the sushi selection. I was most surprised by the variety they had. They had more than just the standard Cailfornia roll, and several specimens of non-rolled sushi as well. On top of that, they looked good. I was able to find one of my favorites as well: Smoked Eel and Avocado Maki. It looked just like it came from a restaurant.

Now for the great part: for $6.99 I was able to get 12 pieces (2 orders) of my favorite sushi. This normally costs a lot more at a sushi restaurant. The kicker: the whole box was only eight points; exactly what the doctor ordered. I could have my cake and eat it too…well sushi anyways. So, moving pat the excellent deal, and weight watchers winning moment, how was it? The sushi was fine. I’ll admit it wasn’t the best sushi that I’ve ever had, but it was on par with several restaurants that I’ve gone to, and I wasn’t disappointed. I’ll definitely get this again, and it doesn’t even need to be a special occasion. As a side note, the California rolls (12 pieces) were only six points. talk about awesome.

The image is courtesy of another person who found the sushi at Stop & Sop to be good as well.

Dieting with a Dunk’s Addiction

I am fortunately no longer dependent on caffeine. To my knowledge, I haven’t had a drop all this week. That may seem like something small, and some people may say “pfft, No Problem”, but millions of people are dependent on things like their morning coffee, of lunch soda to get them through the day. Well, the drawback of this addiction is that it usually entails extra calories, and fat throughout the day. Add to that, most people are in a hurry, and rely on places like Dunkin’ Donuts or Starbucks for their fix. Luckily, Dunk’s has hopped on the healthy bandwagon with some good alternatives.

With their DDSmart menu, Dunkin’ Donuts has taken some of their customers favorites, and given them a healthy twist. This does not mean that every thing on the Smart menu is Weight Watchers safe, but there are some great contenders. Following is a Smart menu to point breakdown:

DD Smart Menu
Drinks:
Small Coffee Coolatta with Skim Milk: 3 Points
Freshly Brewed Unsweetened Iced/Regular Tea: 0 Points
Small Iced/Regular Coffee with Skim Milk: 0 Points
Small Iced/Regular Latte Lite: 2 Points
Food:
Egg White Veggie Flatbread: 6 Points
Egg White Turkey Sausage Flatbread: 6 Points
Egg & Cheese on English Muffin: 7 Points
Ham, Egg & Cheese on English Muffin: 8 Points
English Muffin: 3 Points
Multigrain Bagel (No Cream Cheese): 8 Points
Reduced Fat Blueberry Muffin: 9 Points

Well, there you have it. The drink menu is fairly safe for the Weight Watcher crowd, but saying the food menu is smart doesn’t mean that it’s not high in points. This is something to look out for in health ad campagns from corporate chains. Some of the items offered may very well be healthy, but something that is healthier doesn’t make it good for you. Exhibit A would be the Blueberry Muffin. Yes, there’s less fat in it than the original, but its still sporting 10g. My personal vice is a Coolatta on the weekends, and the skim milk makes it taste better in my mind. Its always good to check your addictions and see what they’re actually costing you.